Sidekick Girl

Saving the City: Sans-Spandex

He pulled the holy water out of his pocket off screen.

It’s totally still Wednesday…

Sorry, folks. ┬áIt’s not that I ran out of time, it’s that I seriously forgot that I hadn’t already done it.

10 responses to “Warrior Priest XIV”

  1. Skipper says:

    I am so confused right now. So very, very confused.

    The possible impending hotness is…befuddling.

  2. Ikiryo says:

    Fortunately, there is a well armed battle priest just behind him unless he was dealt with off-camera.

  3. Twitch says:

    Please, please tell me Isuaro had something with garlic for dinner.

  4. Syncline says:

    Psst, Isuaro?
    You were wondering what to do with your hands? Now would be a good time to turn those knives of yours back on.

  5. Ashe says:

    I blame Anne Rice for pretty vampires.

    Oh sure scoff now. But one day soon the zombie apocalypse will feature undead male underwear models!

    • antlan87 says:

      Naw, they tend to to draw hordes to them, and are the ones who tend to be fully consumed.

    • Narrat says:

      Actually, Anne Rice was following in a slightly older tradition. Bram Stoker’s Dracula is generally considered to be the first “pretty vampire” novel, as the vampire was a compelling and charismatic figure that stood in passionate opposition to the Victorian prudery of the time.

  6. Ken Andrews says:

    Compelling and charismatic, yes. Pretty?

    “His face was a strong, a very strong, aquiline, with high bridge of the thin nose and peculiarly arched nostrils, with lofty domed forehead, and hair growing scantily round the temples but profusely elsewhere. His eyebrows were very massive, almost meeting over the nose, and with bushy hair that seemed to curl in its own profusion. The mouth, so far as I could see it under the heavy moustache, was fixed and rather cruel-looking, with peculiarly sharp white teeth. These protruded over the lips, whose remarkable ruddiness showed astonishing vitality in a man of his years. For the rest, his ears were pale, and at the tops extremely pointed. The chin was broad and strong, and the cheeks firm though thin. The general effect was one of extraordinary pallor.

    Hitherto I had noticed the backs of his hands as they lay on his knees in the firelight, and they had seemed rather white and fine. But seeing them now close to me, I could not but notice that they were rather coarse, broad, with squat fingers. Strange to say, there were hairs in the centre of the palm. The nails were long and fine, and cut to a sharp point. As the Count leaned over me and his hands touched me, I could not repress a shudder. It may have been that his breath was rank, but a horrible feeling of nausea came over me, which, do what I would, I could not conceal.”

    Also:

    “There lay the Count, but looking as if his youth had been half restored. For the white hair and moustache were changed to dark irongrey. The cheeks were fuller, and the white skin seemed ruby-red underneath. The mouth was redder than ever, for on the lips were gouts of fresh blood, which trickled from the corners of the mouth and ran down over the chin and neck. Even the deep, burning eyes seemed set amongst swollen flesh, for the lids and pouches underneath were bloated. It seemed as if the whole awful creature were simply gorged with blood. He lay like a filthy leech, exhausted with his repletion.”

    Not exactly.

    (The above quotes are from Dracula, by Bram Stoker.)

    • Lightweaver says:

      You’re spot-on with Dracula himself, though all of Stoker’s female vampires were portrayed as beautiful seductresses. This might be due to sexisim, or because Dracula was so old a vampire, or a result of any of his other magical dabblings.

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